Keynote Speakers

Keynote Talk 1

Prof. Tsuhan Chen
Prof. Tsuhan Chen
Cornell University (USA)
From Image Processing to Scene Understanding: Learning and Sharing Context for Holistic Image Analysis
Abstract:

Holistic scene understanding involves many sub-tasks, such as depth estimation, scene categorization, saliency detection, object detection, and event categorization. Each of these tasks explains some aspect of a particular scene. In the human visual system, these sub-tasks are often coupled together. One task can leverage the output of another task as contextual information for its own decision, and can also feed useful information back to the other tasks. In this talk, we will discuss how to design algorithms that perform multiple scene understanding tasks in a collaborative way like a human does.

We will show the performance of the proposed algorithms on a variety of applications, including natural scene understanding, images aesthetics assessment, and robotic assistive systems.

Biography:

Tsuhan Chen has been with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, since January 2009, where he is the David E. Burr Professor of Engineering, and served as the Director of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 2009 to 2013. From October 1997 to December 2008, he was a professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he served as the Associate Department Head from 2007 to 2008. From August 1993 to October 1997, he was with AT&T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey. He received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, in 1990 and 1993, respectively. He received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the National Taiwan University in 1987.

Tsuhan served as the Editor-in-Chief for IEEE Transactions on Multimedia in 2002-2004. He also served on the Editorial Board of IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, and as Associate Editor for IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Trans. On Image Processing, IEEE Trans. on Signal Processing, and IEEE Trans. on Multimedia. He co-edited a book titled Multimedia Systems, Standards, and Networks.

Keynote Talk 2

Dr. Tineke M. Egyedi
Dr. Tineke M. Egyedi
The Delft Institute for Research on Standardization (Netherlands)
Standardizing Emergent Innovations in Converging Areas of Technology
Abstract:

In many areas of technology, open standards can function as catalysts of innovation and emerging markets. But deciding when to standardize is still difficult to resolve. Should we standardize early on in the technological trajectory, at a time when still little is known about promising applications and markets? Or rather at a later stage, when these have started to crystallize but when also the vested interests of stakeholders have increased? Heightened stakes may make it near-impossible to develop consensus standards. Timing of standardization is therefore one of the great strategic challenges, and likely one of the key factors in understanding the effect of standardization on innovation. In the field of imaging technologies the convergence of technologies poses additional challenges. In such converging areas, often different technological paradigms, paces in technology and standards development, and standardization cultures need to be bridged as well as different stakeholder interests.

This lecture discusses this twofold challenge of timing standardization in areas of converging technologies. Insights from standardization theory and research are offered, insights that are ingredients for standardization strategy and business development. These insights will be illustrated with imaging technologies.

Biography:

Dr. Tineke M. Egyedi is founder of the Delft Institute for Research on Standardization (DIROS), policy advisor, and senior researcher Standardization at the Delft University of Technology. Her research interests include standards processes and how standards affect innovation. She has collaborated in projects of the EU, the Dutch Science Foundation, Dutch ministries, international companies, the Next Generation Infrastructures Foundation and standardization organizations (e.g. IEC). She publishes in journals ranging from the IEEE Communications Magazine to the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. Based on her latest book Inverse Infrastructures: Disrupting Networks from Below (2012; co-edited by D.C.Mehos) and her work on ‘Standards and Flexible Infrastructures’ she was invited to develop Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) modules. She initiated the game Setting Standards used by universities, by NIST for U.S. policy makers, and by NEN for Chinese ISO standardizers. She is expert to the UNECE Working Party on Regulatory Cooperation and Standardization Policies (STaRT-ED), fellow of the Open Forum Academy, and member of IEEE committees (e.g. co-chair technical program committee SIIT2015; member SC ‘Innovation and Standards in Information and Communication Technologies’ of ComSoc's Emerging Technologies Committee). She was president of the European Academy for Standardization (2005-2011) and chair of the International Cooperation for Education on Standardization (2009-2010). She regularly lectures at home and abroad.

Keynote Talk 3

Prof. James A. Ferwerda
Prof. James A. Ferwerda
Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology (USA)
Image Quality and Material Appearance
Abstract:

Images are a puzzle for vision scientists because they serve as visual representations of objects while also being objects themselves. We have conducted an experiment that investigates observers' abilities to disregard image distortions to correctly perceive the properties of depicted objects. We studied how well low quality (low contrast, blurry) images conveyed information for surface gloss. We found that gloss perception is not affected as much as might be expected by these distortions. We are using these findings to develop new image quality metrics that distinguish between the signal properties of images and the fidelity of the visual information they convey.

Biography:

James A. Ferwerda is an Associate Professor and Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a B.A. in Psychology, M.S. in Computer Graphics, and a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments, and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models. He is an Associate Editor of ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, and serves on the Program Committees of SPIE Electronic Imaging and the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception. In 2003 he was selected by the National Academy of Engineering for the Frontiers of Engineering Program and in 2010 for the National Academies Keck Futures program.

Keynote Talk 4

Dr. Ir. Kars-Michiel Lenssen
Dr. Kars-Michiel H. Lenssen
Philips Research (Netherlands)
E-Skin Technology and Its Application in Smart Windows
Abstract:

Smart windows are windows of which the transmission can be switched. These can be usefully applied, for example, in buildings and transportation (cars, airplanes, …), because it is desirable to be able to control the light, heat and/or privacy.

In recent years we developed a simplified, yet advanced version of our e-paper technology: e-Skin. Since it is less complicated and less expensive to realize, it enables new applications. This e-Skin technology (based on in-plane electrophoretics), promises to provide superior technical properties with respect to existing smart-window technologies, like e.g. larger transmission range, lower power consumption and high switching speed over a large temperature range. A contrast ratio of 70 between the light transmission in the dark vs. the transparent optical state has been demonstrated experimentally. The ultra-low power consumption (in the nW/cm2 to μW/cm2 range) allows the use of energy harvesting; this enables zero-energy e-Skin: autonomous devices that do not need power cables or batteries to function.

The holy grail for smart windows is a solution for active, independent control of incident light and heat. E-Skin technology provides the unique option to realize this by a window foil comprising different particles for control of daylight, respectively heat. For this purpose an electrophoretic suspension has to be developed containing particles of a material that is optically transparent but reflects infrared radiation.

Biography:

Kars-Michiel Lenssen is a Director and Principal Scientist at Philips Research in the Netherlands, leading projects on a.o. smart homes and smart windows. He received his M.Sc. degree in applied physics from Eindhoven University of Technology in 1989. In 1994, he received his Ph.D. from Delft University of Technology and joined Philips Research as a Senior Scientist. In that function, he initiated and led research projects on (giant) magnetoresistance sensors and on MRAM. In the period 2002-2003, he worked as a Philips assignee in Arizona in the framework of the Motorola-Philips-STMicroelectronics alliance. Kars-Michiel coordinated various international cooperation projects with other companies and universities. He holds 26 granted U.S. patents and is (co-) inventor on over 40 patent applications; he (co-) authored over 30 papers in international scientific journals. He also works as an evaluator of research projects for the European Commission and as an Expert for the Skolkovo Foundation.

Keynote Talk 5

Prof. Reinhard Bauman
Prof. Reinhard Bauman
Chrmnitz University (Germany)
Trends in Printed Electronics: Applications and Market Entry
Abstract:

Printing Technologies are additive manufacturing technologies which allow the deposition of materials only at positions where they are needed to assure a certain functionality at that point. In case of traditional printed matter made from colored inks, printers learned over centuries to please the human eye with highly defined clouds of tiny colored screen dots. The employment of inks with functionalities beyond color for the manufacturing of functional patterns on flexible, large area substrates laid the cornerstone for printing applications in fabrication fields which do not belong to the traditional printing industry: the fabrication of flexible displays, intelligent clothing, smart health-care products which adapt well to the body, or various electronics products. These typically web-fed and continuously operated manufacturing systems are based on analog and digital printing equipment which is integrated in appropriate pre and post press technology. The choice of the technologies per printed functionality respectively functional layer depends on the printability of the functional ink.

Future Hybrid Manufacturing Systems will consist of a modular designed machine base which will allow the user to “knob-in” the printing technology he needs for a given functionality, efficiently conflating the traditional and the modern non-impact ones. The deposition of the materials in required patterns will be complemented by further digital manufacturing technologies. The most promising candidate is laser technology for pattern improvement, post-press treatment of the printed patterns, and cutting. This employment of digital fabrication technologies will facilitate very short run lengths and changeover times.

The paper will introduce into digital manufacturing strategies, will discuss opportunities, challenges and limitations of printing smart objects with functionalities beyond color and will compile some promising examples of appropriate products on their way into the market place.

Biography:

Dr. Reinhard R. Baumann is Professor for Digital Printing and Imaging Technology at the Institute for Print and Media Technology of the Chemnitz University of Technology (since 2006) and head of the Printed Functionalities department (since 2007) and the business unit Green and Wireless (since 2010) of the Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nanosystems ENAS in Chemnitz, Germany.

His research interests are future applications of graphic arts technologies in digital manufacturing of Smart Objects, incl. Printed Flexible Electronics.

He graduated from the Leipzig University / Germany in Physics and holds a PhD in Chemical Physics. Primarily his research interests focused on areas of Physical Chemistry and Electrical Engineering of organic materials for polymer electronics at the University of Bonn / Germany and at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose / CA. In 1999 he joined manroland AG, held different management positions in R&D, IT and Services and headed the development of industrial solutions for printing functionalities other than color.

The results of his research activities have been published in numerous journals, conference papers and patents.

Prof. Baumann is one of the founders and since 2004 board member of the Organic Electronic Association oe-a and since 2011 he is Vice President of the International Society for Imaging Science and Technology IS&T.